The Skinny on Raw Fats

By Wayne Gendel on July 13, 2009

Avocados are high in raw fats. Photo by Kristina (threelayercake)/Flickr.com. raw, food, fats, nutritionWhen it comes to fat, most people know they eat too much. But what most people don't realize is they aren't eating enough raw, or uncooked, fats.

Raw fats have plenty of natural abundant enzymes. The main fat enzyme only available in raw fats is called lipase. When cooked, fat molecules expand greatly: If a raw fat molecule were the size of a golf ball, a cooked fat molecule would be basketball-sized. The larger, cooked fat molecule cannot be broken down easily, so it sluggishly circulates through the blood stream and stores as fat and can clog the arteries. Eating raw fats that are rich in lipase actually help to break down the stored bad fats in your body, and can help with weight loss.

So how much raw fat should you be eating? While most authorities say 10 to 40 percent of your total calories should be raw fats, just 10 to 20 percent is ideal. With a diet of less than 10 percent fat, your skin tone lacks luster, but 30 percent or more in fats is just not healthy, and it will put unnecessary strain on your liver. While 10 to 20 percent fats may seem low, you will find you don't need so much fat as you begin eating healthier foods.

On average, a person consumes about 2,000 calories in a day. At 15 to 20 percent raw fats, 300 to 400 calories would come from fats alone. What does that mean to the average person?

Fats are twice as calorie-dense as carbohydrates and proteins. Just one gram of fat packs nine calories. There are about 120 calories per tablespoon of fats in oils, so 2 tablespoons of most oils at lunch and another 2 tablespoons at dinner are the raw healthy fat limit for one person on an average day. Perhaps you love munching on almonds? Just one-half cup is 400 calories—the full amount of fat you should be eating in a day at 20 percent fats. One avocado is 30 grams of fat or 305 calories.

Ideally eating whole food fats are much healthier than consuming calorie rich oils which lack whole food fibers and other nutrition. Choose whole, raw nuts, seeds, olives, avocados and coconut on a daily basis, rather than oils, or worse, high-fat processed foods.

Raw Fats Calorie Guide

Food Quantity Grams of Fat Calories
Oil (coconut, flax, hemp, olive) 1 tbsp. 14 125
Avocado 1 medium 30 305
Olives 8 medium 4 26
Sesame, Sunflower or Pumpkin seeds 1 tbsp. 8 45
Almonds 1/4 cup 17.5 198
Coconut 1 cup 27 285
Raw Cream 1 cup 22 205
Raw Whole Milk 1 cup 8 150
Raw Butter 2 tbsp. 12 101
Raw Goat Milk 1 cup 10 16


More on Raw Eating from Naturally Savvy:

Making the Switch to a Raw Diet

Living Raw: Eating Like Nature Intended

We're Having Guacamole!


By Wayne Gendel| July 13, 2009
Categories:  Eat

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Wayne Gendel

Wayne Gendel

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