Why Feed Your Pet Raw Foods?

By Kimberly Thomson on August 29, 2008

Why Raw Foods For Your Pet? kimberly thompson naturally savvy

You don’t want to eat trans fats or pesticides and other chemicals, so why would you want to feed them to your pets?

Since the commercialization of pet food in the first half of the 20th century, the animals who share our homes have suffered from an increasing number of diseases, and their overall health and life expectancy has dropped considerably.

We now know that for humans, changing your diet can both extend and improve the quality of your life—the explosive growth seen in the health food and alternative medicine industries is a testament to this. But help is on the way for our furry brethren as well, as the raw pet food movement gains traction and a growing number of veterinarians begin to practice holistic medicine on pets.


Why Feed Your Pets Raw Fresh Foods?

You should feed your pet raw foods for the same reason you should feed yourself fresh foods: They're good for you. Commercial pet foods are, for the most part, highly processed fast food for animals—and Fido deserves better than the Big Mac equivalent of puppy chow.

About five years ago the pet food industry began a trend towards using human-grade ingredients. Although this was a very positive step towards creating better pet food and healthier animals, the companies were still cooking the food. Most pet foods are cooked at extremely high temperatures, which kills all the enzymes necessary for proper digestion and destroying 70 to 90 percent of all bio-available nutrients.

Manufacturers know this and add synthetic and or “natural” substances to counter this problem. Just look at the ingredient panel on the back of the tin of cat food you’re opening for Snowball. The label likely contains an extensive list of vitamins and minerals that have been added. They do this so they can meet the minimum nutritional requirements enforced by regulators. The real problem then becomes, that it is impossible to artificially re-produce what has taken Mother Nature millions of years to accomplish in whole live plants and animals.

For processing reasons (a method called extrusion), commercial dry kibble manufacturers can use a maximum of 40 percent meat in the recipe. The food is then subject to very high temperatures and as a result kills off a majority of the nutrients. Last time I checked, no one ever documented a wild dog or wolf setting a fire to cook their meal or getting 60 percent of their diet from grazing on grains.

It took us more than 20 years to test and perfect our recipe for raw pet foods for my kennel of dogs. Now all of our dogs are born and reared on this recipe. Over the years we found that breeding and feeding out own rabbits and chickens produced the best results. Since we started feeding these animals to our dogs, they have never been healthier.

Rabbits are largely—80 per cent—meat and bone, with the remainder consisting of vegetable matter in the form of the stomach and small organs.

Cats and dogs are both naturally carnivorous animals. This means that their internal systems are well-equipped to handle raw meats in an effective manner. Their digestive tracts are short and have adapted perfectly for the digestion of raw meats. Their gastric juices are considerably higher than humans, and help eliminate a certain level of potentially harmful bacteria making cases of salmonella and E-coli contamination extremely unlikely.

If Mother Nature had intended carnivores to eat cooked meat, she would have set their systems up differently and given them a way to cook their food! Rover doesn’t need to learn how to work a pressure cooker, he wants raw food.


By Kimberly Thomson| August 29, 2008
Categories:  Nest

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Kimberly Thomson

Kimberly Thomson

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